#1 Life Goal Hack is To Be Comfortable in Your Skin! | WMA 富道学院

#1 Life Goal is To Be Comfortable in Your Skin!

Image credit: Cultivating Culture

Colourism, Complexion and Criticism …

Over the years the colour of one’s epidermis has been the determining factor of beauty and value.

Universally, fair skins are celebrated and darker skin tones are often seen as degrading and ‘not ideal”.

We have been fooled by advertisements instilling the idea that darker skinned people are bad and fair skinned people are the upper class.

Simple said, skin colour discrimination is a prejudice against the darker skin tone citizens for who we think they are and not for what they truly are.

The question is, what if there was NO existence of the entity called “SKIN TONE?” would everyone bunch up into such partiality than?

BUT WHY SUCH STEREOTYPE EXIST?

Skin discrimination has been living and dominating us throughout our lives.

To an extent that skin discrimination towards another has most time seen a matter to laugh off about and an adequate norm.

Historically, such labels were place upon people in order to divide them into array they fit which apparently did not meet its objective.

In Malaysia for instance we still belittle individual for their skin complexion.

The very recent issue of Haneesya Hanee who is been castigate all over the social media for her skin tone regardless her bravery and talents.

We have been misguided that fairer skin is the indefectible and admissible identity of a person.

Colorism has outruns everything in a person especially towards women.

For example, when a woman gets married the first question that is being asked is “is she dark or fair?” regardless of her achievement, potentials and qualities.

WHO IS BENEFITING FROM THIS?

The beauty industry!

The skin lightening industry is targeted to earn 23 billion dollars by 2020 and its biggest market is in Southeast Asia.

Such idealization towards fair skin has brought a massive profit to the industry but wreck the reality of living in truth with confidence and acceptance.

This can  also be seen in the film and the entertainment industry where the female protagonist is always fair skinned and the antagonist female is constantly dusky or tan skinned.

WHY SKIN DISCRIMINATION IS NOT A JOKE?!

Such distortions regarding skin colour is exposed to an individual since young and such comprehension leads to future racism riots and forlorn among victimised individuals.

We carry the labels that has dominated our mind, labels that made us think fair skin is the ideal skin tone and it is required to be accepted into the society.

We have failed as individual to look at the broader perspective due to such discrimination.

HOW TO PUT A STOP TO THIS?

Isolations upon darker skin colour have been all over Malaysia,

Be it in sports, education, entertainments and even in the corporate industry.

An individual is being criticized for being dark and it seems like a sin if an individual is being born with a dark complexion.

Society labels them as unfit. However, Isn’t that genetics? Isn’t the colour of skin part of the genesis too?  

ASK YOURSELF!

To stop such discrimination, we have to stop judging others for their dark complexion instead motivate them to step out and up from it.

TO CONCLUDE…

Being colored isn’t a sin.

Being coloured is an identity one is born with. Whether one is dark or fair we still bleed red.

Skin colour does not determine values and norms of an individual.

It was made to divide, to discrete. Being coloured is neither crummy nor crappy and the colour of the skin does not define beauty!

So, are you a victim of skin color discrimination, witness it before or the you are the bully that makes fun of another person’s skin tone?

Which ever you are, there is always room to change and focus on loving yourself and spreading the love across to our fellow kinds.

If you liked this article or have any suggestions feel free to drop a comment down below.

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Written by: Thigambarshini . Edited by: Kavitha Manimaharan

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